Recent Sales

My short story “Goodbye is a Mouthful of Water” will appear in the anthology The Playground of Lost Toys (Exile Editions), edited by Colleen Anderson and Ursula Pflug. This is a story about childhood, family, memory, and one of Ontario’s Lost Villages. It’s basically everything I’ve been exploring in my poetry rolled up into one little story. It was the most difficult thing I’ve ever written, and I think it’s also one of my best. Here’s a list of the authors who will appear in the anthology:

  • Karen Abrahamson
  • Nathan Adler
  • Lisa Carreiro
  • Kevin Cockle
  • Geoff Cole
  • Christine Daigle
  • Joe Davies
  • Linda Demuelemeester
  • Candas Jane Dorsey
  • DVS Duncan
  • Rhonda Eikamp
  • Chris Kuriata
  • Claude Lalumière
  • Catherine MacLeod
  • Rati Mehrotra
  • Dominik Parisien
  • Alex C. Renwick
  • Dr.Robert Runte
  • Shane Simmons
  • Kate Story
  • Meghan Whan
  • Melissa Yuan-Innes

I’ve also sold my poem “To A Dying Friend” to the fantastic Uncanny Magazine. I love the work Michael and Lynne Thomas have been doing with the magazine, and it’s a tremendous pleasure to have my work appear there. The poem means a great deal to me–I wrote it in memory of my friend Denise who passed away in September 2013. Here’s part of what I wrote on Facebook the day of her funeral:

“Earlier today I attended the funeral of my good friend, Denise Rager, who passed away in September. She was 83 years old. I met her through Les Petits frères des pauvres, a charity for the elderly without family. The ceremony itself almost felt like the funeral scene from The Great Gatsby – the only people in attendance were the priest and I. When I delivered Denise’s eulogy, it was to her urn alone. It was a very sobering experience. I knew, of course, that the elderly at the charity didn’t have families, but it never struck me before just *how* alone some of them truly are.”

Finally, my poem A Portrait of the Monster as an Artist is now available online at Mythic Delirium. I wrote the poem for Helen Marshall who, incidentally, recently won the Shirley Jackson Award for her truly excellent collection Gifts for the One Who Comes After. The collection has also been nominated for the World Fantasy Award and the British Fantasy Award. If you haven’t read it yet, you should.

Project Updates

Readings are moving along nicely for Clockwork Canada. I’m developing a good list of shortlisted works, but keep those stories coming. The deadline is the end of this month. I’ve responded to all submissions up to March 21st with either a rejection, a rewrite request, or a hold. If you submitted before that and haven’t heard back from me, please query.

Some of the projects I’ve worked on with the VanderMeers have recently had their table of contents posted online. They’re really fantastic books, with exciting lists of contributors.

The first is Sisters of the Revolution: A Feminist Speculative Fiction Anthology, coming out in May from PM Press. It’s a really exciting retrospective from the 1970s onward, with contributions by Eleanor Arnason, Kelly Barnhill, Octavia Butler, Leonora Carrington, Angela Carter, L. Timmel Duchamp, Carol Emshwiller, Kelley Eskridge, Angelica Gorodischer, Hiromi Goto, Eileen Gunn, Nalo Hopkinson, Leena Krohn, Tanith Lee, Ursula K. Le Guin, Rose Lemberg, Pat Murphy, Nnedi Okorafor, Susan Palwick, Kit Reed, Anne Richter, Joanna Russ, Pamela Sargent, Vandana Singh, Rachel Swirsky, Karin Tidbeck (one of my favourite new writers of short fiction), James Tiptree Jr., Catherynne M. Valente, and Elisabeth Vonarburg.

The second is a anthology of original fiction by some of today’s best fantasists, The Bestiary. The book is a modern bestiary of made-up fantastical creatures organized from A to Z, with an ampersand and an invisible letter. Contributors are Karin Lowachee, Gio Clairval, Corey Redekop, Karen Lord, Dexter Palmer, Dean Francis Alfar, Michael Cisco, Brian Conn, Stephen Graham Jones, Brian Evenson, Joseph Nigg, Karen Heuler, Rochita Loenin-Riuz, Felix Gilman, Reza Negarestani, Catherynne M. Valente, Karin Tidbeck, Michal Ajvaz, L.L. Hannett, Micaela Morrissette, Cat Rambo, Eric Schaller, Rikki Ducornet, Amal El-Mohtar, Rhys Hughes, Vandana Singh, Richard Howard, and China Mieville. There are also gorgeous interior illustrations by Ivica Stevanovic. The anthology is a signed, limited edition book from Centipede Press.

I’m working on new anthologies, but more details on those later.

I’ve also had work published recently. My story “Spider Moves the World” was published in issue 6 of Lackington’s, and is now available free online. The story is illustrated by one of my favourite artists, Galen Dara. I’m incredibly pleased with Galen’s illustration for “Spider”. The issue also includes great work by Steven Earnshaw, David K. Yeh, Rhonda Eikamp, L.S. Johnson, and Michael Cisco, as well as illustrations by Tomasz Wieja, Cherry Valance, Carrion House, Likhain, Gregory St. John, and Kat Weaver.

Lastly, my poem “A Portrait of the Monster as an Artist”, written for Helen Marshall, was published in Mythic Delirium 1.4. The poem is available now to subscribers and will be free online in June. This month’s free stories and poems are by C.S. MacCath, Wendy Rathbone, and Jane Yolen, with more work available in the next few months by Jessy Randall, Jane Yolen again, Adam Howe, and Natalia Theodoridou.

Is This Thing On? Trent Radio

Here it is, my first post.

I was recently interviewed on Trent Radio’s Speculating Canada by my friend, the wonderful Derek Newman-Stille, an Aurora-winning blogger and radio host. Derek gently chastised me before and after the interview for not having a website – not the first to do so. I’ve finally caved in. Congratulations, Derek. Or, rather, thanks? Yeah, thanks.

The Speculating Canada website is a great online resource for thoughtful, and accessible, discussions of Canadian speculative fiction. It’s been running for a few years and Derek received the 2013 Aurora award for Best Fan Publication. The radio show is an extension of that, where Derek interviews Canadian authors (last week was Craig Davidson and before that was Gemma Files). I’ve been following Derek’s blog almost since its inception, and I tune in regularly for the radio show. Obviously, it was with tremendous pleasure that I accepted the invitation for the interview.

The interview itself runs about an hour. In it we discuss poetry, my editing, aging, disability, the human body, and several other things. I was a little awkward at first, but Derek quickly put me at ease.